What are y’all’s opinions on programming books?

I’ve never used a book for programming, I’ve always learned by mapping out what I want a program to do and then doing research for each step of the program. So I’m curious, do you prefer learning by book or by using the internet?

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I really tried to learn by book but I never managed to do it, I kinda get bored or I forget what I learned after 2 days :stuck_out_tongue:. I’m kinda doing the same thing as you, I find a project or an idea and I begin to research starting from the most basic stuff to more advanced stuff. Programming books are not for everyone, I guess

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There is a way to go with books, you set up a week and 8 hours a day. then you map out the chapters you deem important and you blitz that shit for the entire week.

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I use a programming book when I move to a new language.

I can never finish those books - just me.

I much prefer picking up https://learnxinyminutes.com/docs/go/ and trying to build something - if it was my first language though, I used codecademy.

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we had to learn at least 3 languages at university. of the many texts we had to use, these two books are the only ones that truly worked for me

the C++ book has been updated a few times since I used it (cough old cough)

I really enjoy reading books, but I have to mix in a practical application to really cement the knowledge. I may read through once, and then go back and actively work on the contents while reading a second time.

I’ve never heard of that website you linked there, it seems pretty cool. I’ll have to give it a try sometime.

I fully agree on you with this, i can’t remember the last book i fully finished, i honestly have ditched the whole ‘Read a book, step by step’ way of learning, as i now incorporate just doing projects as the best way of learning, whenever i learn want to learn a new language, i watch some videos about it, start basic with ‘hello world’ programs and work my way up until i can make some basic projects. Although people learn differently, so my way of learning might be not right for you.

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I’ve gone through several, mainly for Python and Go but for security. I did go through The C Programming Language once and I loved it. Highly recommend it, even if you don’t want to write C.

I did use programming Books they can help a lot. But it‘s on you how fast you learn and how much time you take.

Greetings

Also definitely have to throw this out there. MIT uses this book religiously for a reason. It’s Lisp, but the principles inside are useful in any language.

https://mitpress.mit.edu/sites/default/files/sicp/full-text/book/book.html

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They’re more like guidelines anyway

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It’s interesting, but only for more “advanced” subjects. No need to buy a book on Python for example, when you can learn everything online easily :laughing:

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I have a slightly different opinion on this. As a college student who spent years before college self-teaching myself programming, there is a big difference between a comprehensive learning and learning as much as you need. This might change from person to person but after taking programming courses in college I realized I was never understanding the languages enough. I always learned as much as needed but never grasped the underlying concepts. That’s why I believe either taking an online (free is possible) course or going through a book would have a big contribution to your learning process. Having said that, never leave your practical projects and spend your entire time reading a book. Practice is THE way to learn what you learned.

Also, if you need book suggestions on many languages, I probably can give you one. Let me know on Discord if you have any question!